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Weapons-Armor

Page history last edited by Ian Young 11 years, 6 months ago

Feudal Japanese Weaponry

 

Aiguchi and Tanto

A knife or dagger.  The aiguchi is characterised by its lack of a hilt, while the tanto features a hilt with tsuba, much like its counterparts, the wakizashi and katana.  The blade of neither is greater in length than one shaku, or roughly one foot.  Due to its small size, an aiguchi or tanto will do one die less damage when it strikes (-1D6).  A fumble indicates that the weapon has broken.

 

Katana and Wakizashi

The long sword and short sword (respectively) of the samurai, characterised by the broad, slight curvature to the blade, belying their heritage as cavalry weapons.  The blade of the katana is commonly two shaku in length, though it may be greater, and its handle from one to one-and-a-half shaku. The blade of the wakizashi may range between one and two shaku in length, and its handle one shaku. When worn together, the two swords are referred to as daisho.  Both the katana and wakizashi do normal damage.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has been dropped, but not broken; tied successful resolution rolls indicate that the sword breaks a non-sword weapon.

 

No-dachi

The great sword, constructed in much the same form as the katana or wakizashi, but with a cutting blade well in excess of three shaku, usually about five shaku in length. Due to the extreme length and slenderness of the blade, such swords are seldom better than average in quality.  It does 1D6 extra damage against all targets.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has been dropped, but not broken; tied successful resolution rolls indicate that the sword breaks a non-sword weapon.

 

Naginata

The halberd.  The naginata features a relatively short, spear-like haft, but featuring a large blade in place of a spear point, much like the blade of a tanto or wakizashi.  A mounted warrior may use wield it as a lance.  The naginata delivers an extra 1D6 damage, and its length grants it an additional +5 modifier for footsoldiers against horsemen, negating the footsoldier's normal disadvantage.  When used as a lance, the damage dealt is that of the horse's Damage factor.  A fumble indicates that the naginata has broken.

  

Yari

The yari is a straight spear, commonly five to six shaku in length, usually with a straight, slender, two-edged spear point, though this form may vary.  A mounted warrior may use a yari as a lance.  The yari delivers normal damage when used by a footsholdier, but when used as a lance, the damage dealt is that of the horse's Damage factor.  A fumble indicates that the yari has broken.

 

Hoko

The great spear, requiring two hands to wield.  The hoko is roughly six shaku in length, with a blade set perpendicular to the base of the spear point.  The hoko deals an extra 1D6 damage, and its length grants it an additional +5 modifier for footsoldiers against horsemen, negating the footsoldier's normal disadvantage.

+1D6, +5 for footmen vs. horsemen

 

Masakari

A one-handed battle axe.  It does normal damage against all targets, and an additional 1D6 against any opponent defending with a shield.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has broken.

Normal

 

Ono

A two-handed battle axe with a haft roughly four shaku in length, and a steel head that is often double-bladed.  It does 1D6 extra damage against all targets, and as with the masakari, an additional 1D6 against any opponent defending with a shield.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has broken.

+1D6

 

Tetsubo

The iron staff.  A long, slender club, looking much like a staff that tapers slightly at the handle end, but shod or made of iron, the end of which is often ribbed or tipped with metal studs.  The tetsubo requires the use of both hands, delivering normal damage and an additional 1D6 against chainmail-armored foes.  A fumble indicates that an iron-shod tetsubo breaks, while a solid iron tetsubo is merely dropped.

 

Hankyû

The Japanese short bow ("hankyû" translates as "half-bow"), which measures three shaku in length.  The hankyû delivers 3D6 damage regardless of the user's Damage factor.  The maximum range is 60 yards, and one arrow may be fired per round.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has a broken string or has cracked. 

 

Daikyû

The Japanese longbow, also known as the yumi.  This bow is asymmetrical in design, with two-thirds of the bow above the grip, and the other third below. The daikyû delivers 5D6 damage regardless of the user's Damage factor.  The maximum range is 150 yards, and one arrow may be fired per round.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has a broken string or has cracked. 

 

Shuriken

Commonly referred to as "throwing stars," but available in a number of shapes, including small, slender throwing blades.  Shuriken do one die less damage when they strike (-1D6), though up to three may be thrown per round.  The maximum range is 30 yards.  A fumble indicates that the weapon has been dropped, or the throw has gone wildly astray.

Feudal Japanese Armor

In GENPEI, unlike armor in King Arthur Pendragon, the type and material of armor is not as important as the quality of manufacture, the care and maintenance, and the completeness of the of the suit.  As such, the armor a warrior dons for the battlefield may include some or all of the following elements: 

 

– A chest plate.  Made from a variety of materials and in a number of configurations, the will usually – but not always – cover the back as well.  Usually includes the broad, flat, and squarish shoulder guards known as sode.

Kote – Armored sleeves.

Haidate – Broad, flat, squarish thigh guards, not unlike the sode mentioned above, but worn across the front of the legs like a split apron.

Suneate – Greaves, or shin and calf guards.

Kabuto – A helmet, typically a bowl-shaped cap with a visor and a series of overlapping plates suspended from the back and sides to protect the nape of the neck.  A camp hat, or jingasa – a low, broad, conical helmet – is worn in camp and is the standard battle gear for troops of lesser means than the samurai. 

 

Ashigaru Armor

While the quality of an ashigaru's armor is generally considered good or better, they also offer less overall coverage than an average samurai's.  Consider the typical Ashigaru Armor to consist of a jingasa, , kote, and suneate, offering 6 points of protection from total damage, with a modifier to DEX of -5. 

 

Impoverished Samurai Armor

This is a rag-tag collection of armor pieces, usually scavenged or salvaged as the warrior finds them.  The quality of individual pieces varies greatly, but the overall quality of the suit as a whole is generally poor, as is the completeness of the suit.  Few suits of Impoverished Samurai Armor will include the entire complement of pieces.  Between the spotty quality of the armor and the incomplete coverage it can afford the warrior, Impoverished Samurai Armor offers 4 to 8 points of protection from total damage (at the Gamemaster's discretion), with a modifier to DEX of -5. 

 

Standard Samurai Armor

The typical samurai will invest a considerable sum to maintain a full suit of armor of reasonable quality.  The Standard Samurai Armor typically consists of a kabuto, with sode, kote, haidate, and suneate, and offers 10 points of protection from total damage, with a modifier to DEX of -10. 

 

Upper Samurai Armor

A samurai of means is able to invest not only in a complete suit of armor, but a suit made of superior quality and of improved materials for both better appearance and protection.  Upper Samurai Armor consists of the same elements as the Standard Samurai Armor, but made with a greater percentage of steel and of better manufacture.  It offers 12 points of protection from total damage, with a modifier to DEX of -10. 

 

Daimyô Armor

As with the Upper Samurai Armor, increased means affords increased quality and protection.  Daimyô Armor is beautifully ornate, yet at the same time featuring the best materials and craftsmanship in it construction.  As with other full suits, it consists of a kabuto, with sode, kote, haidate, and suneate, all of the finest quality, and offers 14 points of protection from total damage, with a modifier to DEX of -10.

 

 

A note on shields:  

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